2-day course Fundamentals of DAM for Marketing

Basic courses

GISTICS and its affiliate network, GISTICS Worldwide, offer this immersive two-day classroom course in the SF Bay Area and Greater Amsterdam Area.

This two-day introductory course introduces students to the basic concepts, terminology, practices, and application of digital asset management in marketing operations. It will feature discussions on metadata, workflow, taxonomy, data security, and preservation of digital assets.

IDEAL FOR THESE PROFESSIONALS

  • Art and Photo Buyers
  • Channel Program Managers
  • Corporate Communications
  • Creative Services
  • Graphic and Packaging Design Services
  • IT Program Management
  • Licensing and Clearances
  • Localization Managers
  • Marketing Communications
  • Multimedia, Media Archivist
  • Photo Librarian
  • Sales Support
  • Technical Documents Manager
  • Web Content Specialists

INSTRUCTORS

John Horodyski, teaches a graduate online course at San José State University in Digital Asset Management. John came from Electronic Arts, the largest videogame publisher in the world, where he managed the implementation of their global digital asset management system with more than 500,000 digital photographs and 2D and 3D art assets for creative and publishing needs. He has published professional articles on digital media and metadata as well as presented papers on metadata and video games at various conferences. He holds a Masters Archival Studies and Masters Library and Information Science from the University of British Columbia and is the Contributing Editor to the Journal of Digital Asset Management.

Michael Moon serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Digital Asset Management, LinkedIn Group Manager of Masters of Digital Assets, Masters of Customer Engagement, and Masters of Marketing Operations, and Course Leader of the masterclass series of digital asset management at the Henry Stewart Events Symposia. He has authored an acclaimed book, Firebrands: Building Brand Loyalty in the Internet Age (available in 13 languages) and published over 40 white papers and reports on digital asset management, color management, marketing operations management, and content supply chains. He has delivered more than 300 keynotes, presentations, executive seminars, workshops and web-based teleseminars around the world.

SCHEDULE

Day One: 9:00am – 5:00pm

Introduction to DAM: Concepts and Terms – 9:00 to 10:00 am

We start with an introduction to the fundamentals of digital asset management, mapping key concepts and terms to each session.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Classification Content formats Content management Digital asset Digital media Digital preservation Digital reformatting Electronic business media Faceted classification Information Information Science Metadata Primary sources Records Management Taxonomy Version control

Break 10:00 to 10:15 am

Asset Collections, Digital Libraries, and Databases in Marketing Operations – 10:15 to 11:15 am

This session examines digital multimedia asset collections, grounding students within DAM and their chosen assets.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Databases Digital library Information Architecture Information Science Knowledge Organization

DAM and MRM Systems – 11:15 am to 12:00 pm

This session surveys current DAM systems including enterprise solutions, pure players, mid-market players, lightweight DAMs, niche and open source solutions.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

EMM MOM MRM Open-Source Software Supply Chain Management Vendor

Lunch 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Metadata, Formats and Standards – 1:00 to 2:30 pm

Making metadata work in DAM means investing in the construction of a metadata schema or model; descriptive elements about the assets which enables the user to search for and retrieve the assets.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Categorization Controlled Vocabulary Dublin Core Faceted classification Folksonomy File Format Interoperability Lexicon Metadata METS Ontology Taxonomy

Break 2:30 to 2:45 pm

Taxonomy and Search – 2:45 to 3:30 pm

This session provides an overview of business needs and goals and how best to structure, classify and organize the digital assets for search and retrieval.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Classification Controlled Vocabulary Faceted classification Findability Folksonomy Index Metadata Ontology Semantic Web Taxonomy

Break 3:30 to 3:45 pm

Digital Media Workflows – 3:45 to 3:30 pm

This session delves into the issues involved in identifying, capturing, and ingesting digital media file within a DAM system, thus transforming non-descript files into digital assets optimized from immediate retrieval.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Business Process Modeling Enterprise Content Management Metatag Process Architecture Project Management Workflow XMP XMP Tools

DAM Group Project Work – 4:15 to 4:30 pm

Collaborative work session with students on mini-DAM project.

Day Two: 9:00am – 5:00pm

Data Security – 9:00 to 10:00 am

This session extends the consideration of DAM beyond a physical repository of digital assets and to the management of intellectual properties demanding careful attention to secure access and secure preservation.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Copyright Copyright Protection Creative Commons Data Recovery Data Security Digital Watermarking Encryption

Break 10:00 to 10:15 am

Digital Preservation – 10:15 to 11:15 am

This session will focus on the responsibility of maintaining the integrity and authenticity of digital assets within a DAM for short-term and long-term needs.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Digital Preservation Digital Preservation Initiatives File Format Information Lifecycle Management Preservation Metadata

Digital Rights Management – 11:15 am to 12:00 pm

This session continues the previous session, Digital Preservation, focusing on access control technologies and legal / licensing concerns regarding copyrighted multimedia assets.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Copyright Copyright Protection Creative Commons Open Source Public Domain

Lunch 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Project Management – 1:00 to 2:30 pm

A primer of basic project management methodology in preparation for a DAM installation.

Key concepts from Wikipedia

Project Management Software Development Life Cycle Workflow

Break 2:30 to 2:45 pm

Group Project Work – 2:45 to 3:30 pm

Collaborative work session with students on mini-DAM project.

Break 3:30 to 3:45 pm

Group Presentations – 3:45 to 5:00 pm

Students’ presentations on mini-DAM project.

READING LIST

Day One

Session #1: Introduction to DAM / Concepts and Terms / DAM Systems

Austerberry, D. (2004). Chapters 1 – 4. In Digital asset management. Oxford, UK: Focal Press.

Session #2: Asset Collections / Databases in Marketing Operations

Cornell University Library / Research Department. (2000-2003). Moving theory into practice: Digital imaging tutorial. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html

NISO Framework Advisory Group. (2004). A framework of guidance for building good digital collections, 2nd ed. Bethesda, MD: National Information Standards Organization [NISO]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.niso.org/framework/framework2.html

Noerr, P. (2003). The digital library tool kit, 3rd ed. Santa Clara, CA: Sun Microsystems. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.sun.com/products-n-solutions/edu/whitepapers/digitaltoolkit.html

Smith, A. (2001). Strategies for building digitized collections. Washington, D.C.: Digital Library Federation / Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub101/contents.html

Session #3: DAM Systems

Review of current DAM vendors online and handouts

Session #4: Metadata, Formats and Standards

Dale, R. and Waibel, G. (2004). Capturing technical metadata for digital still images. RLG DigiNews, 8 (5). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20462#article1

Duval, E., Hodgins, W., Sutton, S., and Weibel, S. (2002). Metadata principles and practicalities. D-Lib Magazine, 8 (4). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april02/weibel/04weibel.html

Gill, T., Gilliland, A., and Woodley, M. Baca, M. (ed.). (n.d.). Introduction to metadata: Pathways to digital information, Online edition, version 2.1. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Trust / Getty Standards Program. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.getty.edu/research/institute/standards/intrometadata/index.html

NISO Press. (2004). Understanding metadata. Bethesda, MD: National Information Standards Organization [NISO]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.niso.org/standards/resources/UnderstandingMetadata.pdf

Session #5: Taxonomy and Search

Buckland, M. (1999). Vocabulary as a central concept in library and information science. T. Arpanac et al., (Eds.). Digital libraries: Interdisciplinary concepts, challenges, and opportunities: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia, 23-26 May 1999, 3-12. Zagreb: Lokve. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~buckland/colisvoc.htm

Hodge, G. (2000). Systems of knowledge organization for digital libraries: Beyond traditional authority files. Washington, DC.: Digital Library Federation / Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub91/contents.html

Morris, J. (2003). Putting it together: Taxonomy, classification and search. Transform Magazine, September 2003. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from

http://www.transformmag.com/db_area/archs/2003/09/tfm0309f2_1.shtml

Morrison, J. (2004). How to create effective taxonomy. ZDNet Asia, 18 August 2004.

Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.zdnetasia.com/builder/program/dev/0,39045513,39190441,00.htm

Session #6: Digital Marketing Worfklow

Besser, H. and Trant, J. (1995). Introduction to imaging: Issues in constructing an image database. Santa Monica, CA: Getty Art History Information Program. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.getty.edu/research/institute/standards/introimages/

Noerr, P. (2003). The digital library tool kit, 3rd ed. Santa Clara, CA: Sun Microsystems. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.sun.com/products-n-solutions/edu/whitepapers/digitaltoolkit.html

Sitts, M. (Ed.). (2000). Handbook for digital projects: a management tool for preservation and access, First edition. Andover, MA: Northeast Document Conservation Center. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from

http://www.ncsi.iisc.ernet.in/raja/is214/is214-2006-01-04/dman.pdf

Session #7:

14.  Day Two

Session #8: Data Security

Coyle, K. (2004). Rights management and digital library requirements. Ariadne, 40 (July 2004). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/coyle/

The Economist staff. (2002). Survey: Digital Security: Securing the cloud. The Economist print edition, Oct 24th 2002. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.economist.com/surveys/displaystory.cfm?story_id=1389589

Lawrence, G., Kehoe, W., Rieger, O., Walters, W., and Kenney, A. (2000). Risk management of digital information: A file format investigation. Washington, DC.: Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub93/pub93.pdf

Kodali, N., Farkas, C., and Wijesekera, D. An authorization model for multimedia digital libraries. Journal of Digital Libraries, 4 (3), 139-155. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from

http://www.cse.sc.edu/~farkas/publications/j4.pdf

Session #9: Digital Preservation

Session #10: Digital Rights Management

Ayre, C., and Muir, A. (2004). The right to preserve: The rights issues of digital preservation. D-Lib Magazine, 10 (3). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march04/ayre/03ayre.html

Besser, H. (2000). Digital longevity. Sitts, M. (Ed.). Handbook for digital projects: A management tool for preservation and access. Andover, MA: Northeast Document Conservation Center, 155-66. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.nedcc.org/digital/dighome.htm

Hazen, D., Horrell, J., and Merrill-Oldham, J. (1998). Selecting research collections for digitization. Washington, DC.: Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR].  Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/hazen/pub74.html

Ide, M., MacCarn, D., Shepard, T., and Weisse, L. (2002). Understanding the preservation challenge of digital television.  Building a national strategy for preservation: Issues in digital media archiving. Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR] / Library of Congress. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub106/television.html

Jantz, R. and Giarlo, M. (2005). Digital preservation: Architecture and technology for trusted digital repositories. D-Lib Magazine, 11 (6). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/june05/jantz/06jantz.html

Rusbridge, C. (2006). Excuse me… Some digital preservation fallacies? Ariadne, 46 (February 2006). Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge/

Smith, A. (1999). Why digitize? Washington, DC.: Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub80-smith/pub80.html

Weber, H., and Dörr, M. (1997). Digitization as a means of preservation? European commission on preservation and access. Washington, DC.: Council on Library and Information Resources [CLIR]. Retrieved August 11, 2006, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/digpres/digpres.html

Session #11: Project Management

Project Management: Are We Having Fun Yet? Michigan Library Association, October 30, 2003. Presented by: Nancy A. Lucas, Branch Libraries Coordinator, Michigan State University Libraries

http://www.lib.msu.edu/lucasn/staff/presentations/PROJECTMANAGEMENT.htm

Project managers stay in charge and out front Tom DiVincenzo. Occupational Outlook Quarterly. Washington: Summer 2006. Vol. 50, Iss. 2; p. 19 (7 pages).

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